User Manual – Retro Radio Farm

User Manual

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

USER MANUAL

 

 

 

Thank you for your purchase!

 

Recommended Use:

 

Please refer to online listing for specific information for your particular radio. Depending on the particular product you purchased, some or all of the information below may or may not apply.

 

Your radio is an antique electronic device that has been recently serviced and repaired by Retro Radio Farm (http://www.retroradiofarm.com). The electronic circuitry of your radio has undergone complete repair and rigorous quality control but the original circuitry has not otherwise been altered or redesigned. In the interest of preserving authenticity, your radio electronics has not been refurbished with modern solid state or digital technology. Vacuum tubes are a scarce and obsolete component needed in the operation of your radio. There are no existing manufacturers of these vacuum tubes today. All vacuum tube supplies are remaining original stock from many years ago left over from old radio dealers and repair stores or newly discovered old inventories. Once these supplies are depleted, your radio will not be able to function as it was originally designed.

 

Currently, there is an abundance of sellers online for old vacuum tubes (i.e. Ebay, tubesandmore.com, etc). The vacuum tubes you will find in your radio are the typical All American 5 (AA5) consisting of:

1950's (glass 7-pin):

35W4 - rectifier.  Approximately 1-1/4" - 1-1/2" height.

50C5 - amplifier.  Approximately 1-1/4" - 1-1/2" height.

12AU6 or 12AV6 or 12AT6 - AVC/Modulator.

Approximately 1" height. Not interchangeable

12BA6 - preamp. Approximately 1" height.

12BE6 - Converter. Approximately 1" height.

As long as the glass is intact, it is difficult to tell whether a vacuum tube is dead or defective by visual inspection. A circular brown burn stain on it is normal. A shiny, chrome-like, deposit on the inside of the glass tube is also normal. A milky white deposit on the inside of the tube normally indicates a vacuum leak.

1940's (glass or black metal 8-pin):

35Z5 - rectifier. Approximately 2" height

50L6 - amplifier. Approximately 2" height

12SQ7 - AVC/modulator. Approximately 1-1/2" - 1-3/4" height.

12SK7 -preamp. Approximately 1-1/2" - 1-3/4" height.

12SA7 - Converter. Approximately 1-1/2" - 1-3/4" height.

 

None of these vacuum tubes are interchangeable even though they can plug into any of sockets. Vacuum tubes plug straight in. They are not screwed in like a light bulb. You cannot substitute any of the tubes (i.e. 12AU6) with another of different code (i.e. 12AV6). Any vacuum tube manufacturer of the same code (i.e. RCA 50L6) can be used interchangeably (i.e. Sylvania 50L6). You should be extremely careful when you plug these tubes into their sockets and when you remove them. Remove vacuum tube by gently prying from the base. Be careful not to bend the pins. When installing, be careful to line up the pins. Never use force.

 

Technological advances in consumer electronics and manufacturing has grown by orders of magnitude since the time your radio was originally manufactured. Modern electronics are more safe, reliable, and inexpensive to buy and maintain than their earlier counterparts. You should not expect this old radio to be as reliable as your modern electronic device. Your radio was originally made by hand to some degree, or for the most part. As such, quality control even when it was brand new was unpredictable at best. Add to that, these radios were probably stored and transported throughout the last 50-70 years under various conditions and exposed to moisture, insects and vermin, dust and dirt, extreme heat and cold, for extended periods of time.

Use standard household line voltages (110V-120V).  Do not use on wet surface or metal surface. If radio is wet or submerged, pull plug out and wipe dry before plugging in. Do not drop radio or subject radio to repeated vibration or shock.

Your radio should provide years of trouble free service, but it is not recommended for prolonged periods of continuous use. Do not leave radio on unattended for long periods of time.

Never put your fingers inside the back of the radio when it’s turned on. The radio runs on high voltages and high heat. Electrical shock, burns, injury, or even death may result from direct contact with the electrical components of your radio while it is plugged in.                                

 

Turning your radio on:

Your radio takes approximately 15-30 seconds to warm up. You should be able to see the tubes glowing orange if you look in the back. It should not take more than 1 minute to warm up.

 

Tuning your radio to a radio station:

Your radio was designed to receive AM signal transmissions between 550KHz to 1650 KHz. If you cannot tune into your station, the radio may be out of receiving range. An AM broadcast can only be received within a certain distance approximately 10 miles to 30 miles form transmission point. Try tuning into the same station with another AM receiver as a test. Being able to receive satellite or WiFi does not mean you will be able to receive AM as the technologies are different.

 

If your Retro Radio is equipped with a clock:

Your Retro Radio clock is a mechanical design powered by an electric motor that is designed to keep accurate time using standard household power at 120V @ 60Hz. Clocks are designed to run as soon as you plug Retro Radio into the outlet. There is no on/off switch for the clock.

 

Setting the clock

The clock will have a set screw in back. You will need turn the set screw either clockwise of counter clockwise depending on the manufacturer. You may need to push the set screw in or pull it out while you turn clockwise or counter clockwise. Different manufacturers and different models employ various designs to accomplish the set time feature.

Setting the alarm

The clock will have a ON OFF or ALARM or AUTO setting. Turn to Auto or ALARM accordingly. Some alarms were featured with a alarm buzzer when set to auto. The radio and buzzer or just the buzzer will come on when alarm time is reached.

Setting sleep time

Turn sleep time. Radio must be turned on. Radio will turn on when sleep time counts down and reaches zero. If your radio doesn’t work, you need to be sure the sleep time is set to zero.

 

 

 

 

MP3 Option:

If your radio has been adapted for MP3 or auxiliary audio input option, you will see a RCA input jack on the back or side of the radio chassis or cabinet. The radio accepts audio input from iPhone, iPad, MP3 player input using a 3.5 mm to mono RCA cable which is included. Switch from radio to auxiliary audio input using the toggle switch located on the back panel. If your radio is equipped with a 3 position toggle switch, it is not recommended to keep the toggle switch in center bypass position with loud volume for extended period of time. If you radio was originally designed with an auxiliary audio input, just plug into the RCA input jack with the 3.5mm-to-mono RCA cable included. You may need to adjust volume level when you switch from auxiliary to radio and back.

 

Issue

Resolution

Won’t turn on

 

Make sure the outlet power is on. Some outlets are wired to the wall switch. The power to the outlet is not on until you turn on the wall switch. Test outlet with a household lamp

Tubes are loose or have come out of socket. Unplug power cord and inspect all sockets. There should be 5 tubes. If you remove tubes, you must be sure to put tubes back into the correct socket. It does not matter what order you put tubes back into sockets. However, if you put tubes back in wrong sockets you may burn out one or more tubes and destroy your radio.

Tubes glow but no sound

May need longer to warm up.

One of the tubes may be defective, burned out.

One of the speaker wires has been disconnected.

Tubes glow but volume very low

One of the tubes is weak

Antenna wire has been disconnected

Bad reception

 

 

AM radio stations turn their transmitter down past 8PM nationwide in the USA. You will hear a loud buzzing or humming noise.

Re-orient the radio facing a different direction and try different locations in your house.

Radio may need an external antenna wire. Most of these old radios were fitted with an external antenna attachment on the backing board. It will be a flathead screw and may even be labeled for external antenna.

Scratchy noises

Dirty electrical contacts. All components have been thoroughly cleaned when your radio was serviced. However, exposure to dust, particles, and moisture even with normal use and care can result in scratchy sounds when you turn the volume and tuning knobs. A good way to clean these contacts is with electrical cleaner found at most auto supply stores. Always make sure the radio is not plugged in when you clean your radio with any kind of cleaner. Makes sure the cleaner has thoroughly dried before turning radio back on.

Warbly sounding, motorboating, pulsing sound

Your radio will need service from an experienced repair person.

Radio plays fine but stops playing completely after a while

One or more tubes may be weak or loose in its socket. Vacuum tubes are a consumable and by design were intended to be replaced by the consumer from time to time.

There is an issue with an electrical connection and will need service from an experienced repair person.

Radio plays but stops playing and a crashing sound is heard

Your radio will need service from an experienced repair person.

Ghost transmissions are heard. Hear two radio stations one over the other.

Your radio will need service from an experienced repair person.

High pitch squealing or squelching sound

Your radio is picking up interference from another electronic device, halogen/LED lamp, smartphone, cable set top box, computer, modem or router, microwave oven, radio or high tension wire.

 

If your radio is equipped with Bluetooth MP3, keep the back panel rocker switch (if equipped) in either RADIO or PHONO position but not in the middle position. Turn volume down until squeal goes away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WARRANTIES AND DISCLAIMERS:

MAY CAUSE ELECTRIC SHOCK AND SERIOUS OR FATAL INJURY. KEEP AWAY FROM CHILDREN. USE THIS DEVICE AT YOUR OWN RISK. RETRORADIOFARM.COM, ITS OWNERS, OFFICERS, AND AFFILIATES ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE OR LIABLE FOR INJURIES, DEATH, OR DEATH RESULTING FROM INJURIES SUSTAINED FROM THE UNINTENDED AND INTENDED USE OF THIS ELECTRONIC DEVICE. RETRORADIOFARM.COM HAS NOT REFURBISHED OR REENGINEERED THIS DEVICE FROM MANUFACTURER ORIGINAL SPECIFICATIONS. ALL TRADEMARKS AND COPYRIGHTS ARE THE PROPERTY OF THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS. RETRORADIOFARM.COM IS NOT AN AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE, DEALER, OR REPAIR CENTER FOR ANY OF THE MANUFACTURERS OF THE RADIOS IT SELLS OR REPAIRS. NO WARRANTIES EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED ARE MADE BY RETRORADIOFARM.COM REGARDING THE MANUFACTURE, DESIGN, OR SERVICE OF THIS ELECTRONIC DEVICE .

 

 

Copyright © 2015 by Retro Radio Farm

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

 


 

 

 

GETTING STARTED (ONLY FOR RADIOS EQUIPPED WITH BLUETOOTH MP3 CAPABILITY)

 

H166 Bluetooth Receiver – Instructions to set up.

 

Your vintage radio has been modified to receive Bluetooth MP3 wirelessly or with 3.5mm to mono-RCA cable that is included.

 

SETUP INSTRUCTIONS FOR BLUETOOTH MP3:

 

  1. CHARGING: Make sure H166 Bluetooth receiver is fully charged by plugging in mini-USB to USB cable into any 5V iPhone, Android, or other AC Adapter. Take approximately 1 hr to charge. Turn receiver in off mode to charge. The red LED light will be on. If the blue LED is blinking, the receiver is in transmit mode. It will take longer to charge the receiver while it is also in transmit or play mode. When the H166 receiver is fully charged, the red LED light will turn off.
  2. Pictures of sample 5V household AC adapters from iPhones, Macbook, Amazon smartphone charger (not included)
  3. CONNECTING: Plug the receiver into the RCA socket on your radio using the 3.5mm to mono-RCA cable that is included. Set the rocker switch on the back of your radio to “PHONO” position.

 

  1. PAIRING: Turn on the Bluetooth receiver with the slider switch located on receiver. The LED lights with blink red and blue alternately. On your MP3 player, go to Settings menu, select Bluetooth. If your device does not have a Settings menu, go to Bluetooth:
  2. Picture of Bluetooth universal symbol.
  3. Your Bluetooth menu on your MP3 player device will list all the available devices. Select H166 to pair. The blue LED light on the receiver will be blinking when it is paired with your MP3 player.
  4. Password is 0000 if your Bluetooth receiver is named ‘H166’ in your Bluetooth settings menu of your player source device. Password is 1234 if your Bluetooth receiver is named ‘D-DLink’ in your source device.

Android Smartphone

 

Macbook

You are connected!

  1. PLAYING MP3 MUSIC: Go to your MP3 Player menu, select your favorite music and play!

Your H166 Bluetooth receiver can only pair to one device at a time. If you want to pair with another device, you must make sure other devices are not also paired at the same time by turning Bluetooth off on other devices or disconnecting H166 pairing on the other devices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Issue

Resolution

  1. Bluetooth receiver won’t pair. You see spinning timer wheel on your Bluetooth MP3 player

You may have another device paired with this player. You will need to remove other devices which may have been paired.

to be recharged.

You need to turn on the Bluetooth receiver located on the back of the Retro Radio.

Close the pairing window, turn everything off,  and start over.

The cable is twisted and not connected properly.

The switch on the back of your Retro Radio is not turned to phono. It is set on Radio or in center ‘off’ position.

 

The Bluetooth receiver on the back of your Retro radio is weak and needs to be recharged.

You did not enter the PIN correctly or you did not enter the correct PIN.

  1. The Bluetooth volume is very low or inaudible

 

 

You may need to experiment with various Bluetooth MP3 players. All modern Bluetooth MP3 devices play at relatively different transmitting volumes depending on the manufacturer, device, device condition, environmental factors, etc.

 

You need to turn up the volume on the Bluetooth MP3 player or Retro Radio or both. You may need to turn it up all the way. It will not harm the Retro Radio or your Bluetooth MP3 player.

  1. The radio plays a lot louder than the Bluetooth MP3.
  2. To some degree, this is expected. The Bluetooth signal is transmitted through the air. The radio plays across a direct electrical connection. The volumes have been best adjusted to be approximately similar, but some variance between the two volumes is expected and unavoidable without extensive modifications.
  3. I felt a shock. Not static charge.

Turn off the Retro Radio and Bluetooth MP3 receiver. Unplug your Bluetooth MP3 player device, if you have connected it directly using the included cable. Unplug the Retro Radio. Contact a qualified service professional.

  1. Bluetooth MP3 feature stops working.

Recharge the battery using charging cable included.

Check whether your Smart Charger is standard 5V USB

 

 

 

PIN Information

 

In your setting window, here is PIN information to pair your Bluetooth receiver:

 

Bluetooth Device

PIN

H166

0000

DL-Link

1234

 

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